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KiCAD Forums

Last updated: 30 Aug 2014 - 16:08

A few weeks ago Chris Gammell (of The Amp Hour and more recently Contextual Electronics) has released his set of KiCAD videos, and set up a forum for users to discus the software, all available on the new kicad.info site. I've been using KiCAD for about 6 years now (I looked up my first PCB order I designed with it and it was September 2008) and whilst I happily recommend it to anyone who wants to get into PCB design, I've completely forgotten how complex it is to learn to use. I think the video series is a great starting point and the forums are a good way to troubleshoot specific issues you have. There are a good number of people on there now but the more people, the better the range of discussion. There are a couple of existing mailing lists for KiCAD, the developers mailing list on Launchpad and a users mailing list which is a Yahoo group that always gave me a really terrible user experience. The new forum is much more intuitive and interactive.

Section:
Reviews
Tags:
Open Source,
kicad,
eda

Engineering Glossary

Last updated: 24 Aug 2014 - 22:06

One of my contacts at Element 14 got in touch last week to let me know they've been putting together an Engineering Glossary. There's a good range of terms there with brief definitions. The great thing about a subject specific list like this is that you know you're going to get the thing you're looking for rather than the same acronym in a completely unrelated field. It isn't a wiki, so you can't add or update definitions but there's a feedback form on the page if you want to send in a comment.

Section:
Reviews
Tags:
electronics,
Engineering,
Reference

Stripboard Circuit Construction

Last updated: 21 May 2014 - 21:59

Before cheap prototype PCB services like OSHPark, Ragworm and iTeadStudio options for building circuits for prototype or hobby projects were much more limited. You could etch your own board, carve a board out of copper clad with an abrasive tool, wire-wrap it all or use stripboard.

Stripboard, sometimes known as Vero-board (after a popular manufacturer) is a kind of circuit board, usually a cheap substrate like SRBP, with long strips of copper about 2mm wide running the length of the board. Holes are typically punched on a 0.1" (2.54mm) grid across the board, making it easy to fit traditional through-hole components.

The basic technique of construction is to use a small drill type tool, known as a spot-face cutter, to cut the long traces to make separate parts of the circuit. Wires are run, perpendicular to the copper tracks to create links in the opposite direction, allowing complex circuits to be built up.

Section:
Tutorials
Tags:
electronics,
Tools,
Prototyping,
hobby

Trimming Silk Screen on KiCad

Last updated: 18 May 2014 - 15:03

Offending Silk Screen

A few connectors and the heatsink in this design are over-hanging the board.

A few connectors and the heatsink in this design are over-hanging the board.

Sometimes when submitting boards for cheap panelised manufacture you need to keep all of the layers of the gerber file within the size of the PCB. In some boards I find there are bits of silk screen (e.g. connector outlines) which overlap the edge of the board. As far as I can see there's no way to limit the silk screen to the edges of the board by default, but I have a work around that might be useful.

Section:
Tutorials
Tags:
kicad,
PCB

Tools: Mini Reamer

Last updated: 10 May 2014 - 12:50

Mini Reamer

A very handy little tool of high quality.

A very handy little tool of high quality.

Stripboard construction and home-made PCBs are going out of fashion these days, but for the odd power supply or prototype they're still often worth doing. One of the most annoying problems I regularly face when building things (especially power supplies) on stripboard is components with leads too big to fit. Most cheap stripboard tends to use punched holes between 0.8 and 1.0mm in diameter (about 40 thou). With power-handling components particularly leads can be 1.0mm or even bigger, and they just won't push through the board. Opening out holes with a craft knife can be tricky, and having a range of tiny drill bits can be costly (especially as they're really easy to snap). The best solution is a mini reamer.

Section:
Reviews
Tags:
Tools,
Prototyping

Novena Open Source Laptop

Last updated: 30 Apr 2014 - 21:06

The idea of an open source laptop makes me feel the same excitement I felt using Linux for the first time over a decade ago.

Earlier this month Andrew "bunnie" Huang, hacker of the Xbox (read the book) and creater of the Chumby announced a crowd funding campaign for his Novena open-source laptop. I'd heard about the project before and liked the design. In fact I have several almost identical system level designs in my engineering notebook waiting for me to have the time and money to make one myself. Since it is unlikely I'd ever get around to building anything that costly or complex on my own I'm really excited to hear that I can buy one of someone else's design.

Section:
Reviews
Tags:
linux,
hacking,
Open Hardware

Bistable 555 Circuit

Last updated: 23 Feb 2014 - 21:16

555 Bistable Schematic

Basic toggle function starts in the "off" state implemented with a 555.

Basic toggle function starts in the "off" state implemented with a 555.

I'm working on a power supply design and I wanted to have the output on/off button just a momentary push button. The main reason for this was to make sure that the output was always off when the power came back on. You don't want to have the output get knocked on whilst moving the power supply and accidentally put too many volts into a prototype!

Section:
Projects
Tags:
555,
bi-stable,
toggle button

This, Jen, is the Internet

Last updated: 02 Nov 2013 - 14:22

The Internet

This, Jen, is the internet.

This, Jen, is the internet.

For OggCamp this year I had the idea of taking along a replica of The Internet from the British TV series The IT Crowd. If you haven't seen the episode, it revolves around a clueless IT manager being selected as the employee of the month. As employee of the month she is expected to make a presentation to the shareholders about her area of expertise. Keen to show her up, the two support guys manage to convince her that a small black box with a red flashing light is actually the Internet.

The box has become a favourite amongst fans of the program with dozens of versions of it having been built. It even made a brief appearance in the final episode of the series broadcast earlier this year.

Section:
Projects
Tags:
linux,
wifi,
The internet,
IT Crowd,
fun,
Raspberry Pi

OggCamp 13: Forking Hardware!

Last updated: 19 Oct 2013 - 09:31

This year at OggCamp I presented on using version control to manage hardware projects. It's something I think will be really important as the barrier to spinning a new hardware design gets lower and lower. Below are the slides from the talk I did.

Section:
Tutorials
Tags:
GIT,
kicad,
3D printing,
hardware,
work-flow

3D Printed Nativity Set

Last updated: 27 Nov 2012 - 12:48

3D Printed Nativity Set

All the figures included, printed and then painted.

All the figures included, printed and then painted.

This is nearly a year old now, but by the time I finished it last year it was too late for anyone else to have a go, so rather than publish just after Christmas and have it forgotten I sat on it for nearly a year. I was looking for a small Christmas themed plastic model to put in home made crackers for family. In the end I came up with the idea of designing a minimalist nativity set which once everyone pulled their crackers could all be assembled. It all went down well with both my family and Katie's.

Section:
Projects
Tags:
RepRap,
3D printing,
Christmas decoration